Saturday, January 23, 2010

Wild Card Weekend - Change


This weekend join Desireable Sandra Hyatt with her blog about the need for change!

Romance novels often start at a point of change—either for the hero or the heroine and often both of them.


She's just lost her job but needs money to support her ailing parents. He needs a wife to win that contract with the family focused firm. Do I sense a marriage of convenience story coming up?

The man who loved and left her is suddenly back in town. Sounds like a reunion story with maybe a pregnancy or a secret baby in there too.

A handsome stranger lands on her doorstep one snowy night and our reclusive heroine is suddenly having to open her home and her heart.

Whatever the setup, change is in the air for our hero and heroine. Their worlds are about to be turned upside down. How they grow and change (and the best part of that change is the falling in love) is why we read their stories.

It's all well and good—and easy—to read about change foisted on characters in books. In that case, the bigger the change the better, I say. But what about when change is foisted on you. My teenage daughter is about to leave New Zealand and go and live in Canada for a year as an exchange student. And much as there have been times that I've mentally counted the years till my home was child free the reality of just one child leaving the nest is suddenly overwhelming. I know she will have a fantastic year, but…what about those of us left behind i.e. me?

If that's the biggest change in my life this year then I should probably be grateful. I'll squirrel away the emotions and sense of loss for when I need them for a character in a book and I plan on writing more and reading more (with time saved by not running around after her) but am not sure that will be enough of a distraction. So, I'm on the lookout for good strategies for dealing with change.

I'll give away a copy of my current book The Magnate's Pregnancy Proposal to one lucky commenter.



Sandra's current release is The Magnate's Pregnancy Proposal (Silhouette Desire January 2010)


Chastity Stevens was carrying a Masters child…but not from the brother she thought. Though she'd received in vitro fertilization to carry her dead husband's child, she didn't realize it was his brother's sample she'd used.


Millionaire Gabe Masters had never cared for his brother's wife …or so he always told himself. When Chastity revealed she was pregnant by her late husband, Gabe knew the child was his. Now he would do whatever it took to claim the child she carried—their child—as his own.



19 comments:

  1. I enjoyed reading the post. The Magnate's Pregnancy Proposal sounds really good.

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  2. It's never easy when your children leave, even if only for a while. I've been through it twice with my two daughters. Even though they are 33 and 27 and have been moved out for years, I still miss them, even though I see them just about every day. I talk to them daily too. It's just not the same. My oldest daughter moved out once and then figured out how expensive it was and moved back home for a couple of more years. It gave me a taste of what it was going to be like. That's probably what this will do for you so you will be better prepared for when she moves out permantly. It never gets easy though.

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  3. Hi Sandra. It's never easy when they fly the nest is it? Strategies for coping? If you haven't already got one (and aren't afraid of them) then get a dog. They make you get up, take them out, and pester you like any child can! (Well they do in my house anyway!) Saying that I do find that when I'm walking them you do get to think about plots and re-filling the well. All that fresh air etc is all good stuff for the muse IMHO. Other things? Taking an evening class in something - flower arranging, wine tasting (always a good one. Have a good weekend. Caroline x.

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  4. It's not much of a bit of advice, but displacement activity does work. It needs to be something you've committed to do, preferably for other people, so you can't just decide 'oh, I don't feel like it'. Or something for your daughter to enjoy when she comes back - re-decorate her room, build a gazebo in the garden, knit an afghan.

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  5. Adjusting to change - I feel you have to allow yourself those moments of how things used to be. They will bring a smile to your face. And then try to think of something positive about the whole situation - what it means to her or to you.
    I'm sure she will miss you as much as you will miss her.

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  6. How lovely for you that your butterfly is leaving the cocoon, spreading her wings in flight. She leaves as a child of your heart, and she will return as a young woman. Your daughter. Your friend for life : )

    gcwhiskas at aol dot com

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  7. It sounds exciting for your daughter and for me, I have found as my children grew and needed me less and less that I did have more time so I use it to do things that I didn't have time for in the past like spending more time gardening or trying new recipes. Plus we adopted two kittens and they don't mind being babied.

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  8. Hi Becky - I hope you enjoy The Magnate's Pregnancy Proposal. It made the USA Today Bestseller List this week which I was thrilled to bits about (and a little stunned).

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  9. Lisa - she's been gone four days now but I've heard from her and she's having a fantastic time - which does make it easier (a little).

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  10. Hi Caroline - we do have a dog and he's great for making me get out of the house and get some exercise. I've also recently started taking piano lessons - maybe I should set myself a goal of learning a special piece or two before she comes back.

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  11. Alison - so when you said displacement activity, you didn't mean eating chocolate did you? :)

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  12. Marcie - you're right, of course, allowing yourself time to adjust is crucial. And the good thing is, this time at least, I know she's coming back in a finite period of time (it's just a long period).

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  13. Virginia - what a lovely way to look at it. Thank you.

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  14. Maureen - it would definitely be productive use of my time if I was able to write an extra book in the time she was away. Maybe I'll make that a goal too.

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  15. Well Sandra, we Canadians do tend to be a fairly friendly bunch, so I hope her time here is wonderful and memorable!

    Change...turning points...who says life doesn't imitate art?

    Thanks for visiting with us this weekend!

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  16. HI Donna - it's always fun to visit here. Thanks for having me.

    NZers and Canadians seem to be quite a natural pairing. I have quite a few Canadian friends in NZ and vice versa.

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  17. great story by the sounds of it;
    I am sure your daughter will have an exciting time in Canada- what a learning experience for her. Also for you as she will be one less there but it is a growing experience for everyone.
    I am from Canada and we are nice as someone stated, lol.

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  18. Hi Robyn - she's already having a great time, have had several emails (though not enough for this mother). And to know that she's enjoying herself certainly eases my anxiety. And I'm keeping track of my emotions because I'm certain I'll be able to use them in a book!

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  19. Book Winner

    I did the random number thing on my computer and, drum roll, Virginia C if you'd like to contact me at sandra @ sandrahyatt dot com with your snail mail address I'd love to send you a copy of The Magnate's Pregnancy Proposal.

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